Tag Archives: United Kingdom

Inequality is not just about money. Inequality is literally a killing field.

Inequality is a socio-cultural order which reduces our capabilities to function as human beings, our health, our dignity, our sense of self, as well as our resources to act and participate in the world— argues Göran Therborn (University of Cambridge) … Continue reading

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Financialization, New Investment Funds, and Labour: An International Comparison

Financialization, New Investment Funds, and Labour: An International Comparison provides a comprehensive analysis of the development of New Investment Funds —private equity, hedge funds, and sovereign wealth funds—and their impact upon labour and employment. Several countries are selected for in-depth treatment: US, UK, … Continue reading

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Varieties of Capitalism classification is not applicable to Asia

“Asian business systems: institutional comparison, clusters and implications for varieties of capitalism and business systems theory” (open access paper) presents an institutional comparison of 13 major Asian business systems—China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Korea, … Continue reading

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Why are banking systems unstable in some countries–but not in others? Since 1840, the US had 12 crises; Canada had none.

Analyzing the political and banking history of the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Brazil through several centuries, “Fragile by Design” (Free access to the First chapter) demonstrates that chronic banking crises and scarce credit are not accidents … Continue reading

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The End of Protest: How Free-Market Capitalism Learned to Control Dissent

The End of Protest: How Free-Market Capitalism Learned to Control Dissent by Alasdair Roberts explains how governments learned to unleash market forces while also avoiding protest about the market’s failures.  The US has just gone through the worst economic crisis in a generation. Why … Continue reading

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Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World

Today I recalled this fascinating book “Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World” by Liaquat Ahamed. It’s commonly believed that the Great Depression that began in 1929 resulted from a confluence of events beyond any one person’s or … Continue reading

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The Making of British Socialism: Uniting Hope, Faith and Economics

Why did the British Marxists follow a Tory aristocrat who dressed in a frock coat and top hat? What was the role of Christian theology and idealist philosophy in shaping socialist ideas? Did the Fabians develop a new economic theory? … Continue reading

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Regulating International Finance and the Evolving Imbalance of Capitalisms since the 1970s

This worth-reading paper puts the ongoing G20 process of improving the regulation of international finance into a historically informed perspective. To understand the driving forces behind and obstacles to international cooperation in governing finance, Thomas Kalinowski (Max Planck Institute for … Continue reading

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Evolution of British Economic Sociology: From Local and ‘Industrial’ to Comparative and ‘Economic’

What have been the key shifts of emphasis in the research agenda of British economic sociology over the last four decades? Duncan Gallie (Nuffield College) tackles this question and presents a concise and interesting review of changing perspectives in British … Continue reading

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