Monthly Archives: December 2011

Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine

Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine is an excellent award-winning book that systematically examine why academic science made such a dramatic move toward the market. Drawing on extensive historical research, Elizabeth Popp Berman shows how the government–influenced … Continue reading

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Against Capitalism – Gerald Allan Cohen

In this short talk, a political philosopher Gerald “Jerry” Cohen offers a eloquent critique of capitalism. His critique revolves around common defenses. He suggests that even the existence of people who have earned their riches legitimately and through their own … Continue reading

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The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of The World

“The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World” is Harvard professor Niall Ferguson’s an (4 hours) television documentary, based on his famous book. Ferguson follows the money to tell the human story behind the evolution of finance, from … Continue reading

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Front Page Economics: How Popular Economic Storytelling Changed (in) America

This new book provides a subtle and probing look at how ideologies are packaged and transmitted to the casual newspaper reader. In Front Page Economics, a noted sociologist Gerald D. Suttles examines coverage of two major economic crashes—in 1929 and … Continue reading

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Max Weber in America

Me and my wife visited the United States in 1904 after sending the first part of “The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism” to press. The trip was a turning point in my life and it played a pivotal … Continue reading

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Capitalism Takes Command: the Social Transformation of 19th Century America

A new volume of multidisciplinary essays Capitalism Takes Command, edited by Michael Zakim and Gary J. Kornblith, presents a history of family farming, general incorporation laws, mortgage payments, inheritance practices, office systems, and risk management—an inventory of the means by which capitalism became … Continue reading

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DEBT

Recently, we got used to see David Graeber on TV, as one of the unofficial leaders of the Occupy movement; so what could be a better occasion to feature his unique book “Debt: The First 5,000 Years”. Graeber- professor of … Continue reading

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The Past, Present, and Future of Economics for History

The summer issue of Social Science History was devoted to the theme of “The Past, Present, and Future of Economics for History” and it has several interesting papers (open access): – Perhaps We Can Talk: David B. Riden Comments for “Taking Stock … Continue reading

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Capital Ideas: The IMF and the Rise of Financial Liberalization

Economic sociologists and political economists must not stop their research at the stage of analyzing the policy and its implications, but rather must go deeper and examine how decisions are made within governance bodies and policy making organizations on national and … Continue reading

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Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World

Today I recalled this fascinating book “Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World” by Liaquat Ahamed. It’s commonly believed that the Great Depression that began in 1929 resulted from a confluence of events beyond any one person’s or … Continue reading

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The Sense of Dissonance: Accounts of Worth in Economic Life

David Stark argues, firms would often be better off, especially in managing change, if they allowed multiple logics of worth and did not necessarily discourage uncertainty. In fact, in many cases multiple orders of worth are unavoidable, so organizations and firms … Continue reading

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Understanding the Occupy Movement: Perspectives from the Social Sciences

This forum  is designed to bring together douzens of essays, critical commentary, and eventually research of social scientists on the Occupy Movement. As analyses and “spin” of Occupations grow, we confront the sort of public issue to which a social science … Continue reading

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Spiritual Economies: Islam, Globalization, and the Afterlife of Development

An innovative and surprising book Spiritual Economies: Islam, Globalization, and the Afterlife of Development by Daromir Rudnyckyj challenges widespread assumptions about contemporary Islam by showing how moderate Muslims in Southeast Asia are reinterpreting Islam not to reject modernity but to create a “spiritual economy” … Continue reading

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Austerity: we are not all in it together

By Michael Kitson, Ron Martin, and Peter Tyler Europe has a Greek tragedy; the US is grappling with a Tea Party; and in the UK we have the economic consequences of austerity.   The focus is budget deficits, public expenditure cuts … Continue reading

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