Great academic opportunities: 6 calls for papers, 4 job openings, 2 PhD and 1 Postdoc positions

call for papersSee below a list of great academic opportunities: calls for papers and proposals, PhD and Postdoc positions, and job openings in various themes and related topics of economic sociology and political economy, with September 30 – October 14 deadlines. Share this list with your colleagues and students. Good luck!

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

Posted in Academic announcements | Leave a comment

BITS & BRIEFS: Illegal migration industry // Ignorance and economic policy // Cash-Free utopia // Sociology of Silicon Valley

cash-free

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

 

Posted in BITS & BRIEFS | Leave a comment

The Art of Central Banking

– “How does the central bank decide on interest rate? Taking all data together and using a formula?”
– “This is art, not science.” (The Governor of the Central Bank of Israel Karnit Flug reveals the secret of monetarism and  economics  of central banking, September  14, 2016)

central-bank

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

Posted in Economists quotes on economics, joke | Tagged | 3 Comments

Global Political Economy and Its Discontents: Power, Politics and Investment Treaties in Developing Countries

There is a widely accepted opinion among a general public, policy makers and economists that investment treaties between the West and developing countries greatly benefit the latter. But is this view correct? Well, for sure the story is far more complex than it seems. An interesting and eye-opening book Bounded Rationality and Economic Diplomacy: The Politics of Investment Treaties in Developing Countries, by Lauge N. Skovgaard Poulsen (University College London), scrutinizes this topic and presents  a comprehensive analysis of this frequently overlooked aspect of global political economy.
Bounded Rationality and Economic Diplomacy The Politics of Investment Treaties in Developing CountriesThis book shows that governments in developing countries typically overestimated the economic benefits of investment treaties and practically ignored their risks. Focusing on various cases (Pakistan, Ghana, the Czech Republic, Russia, Costa Rica, South Africa and more), the author highlights how local policy-makers often relied on inferential shortcuts when assessing the implications of the treaties. These investment treaties gave private arbitrators power to determine whether governments should pay compensation to foreign investors for a wide range of sovereign acts. World Bank, US and UN officials also promoted the treaties and so did Western lawyers and advisors.
During the 1990s and early 2000s, developing countries have incurred significant liabilities from investment treaty arbitration and paid billions of dollars to the Western corporations. The core questions of this research are why developing countries have signed largely identical treaties which significantly constrained their sovereignty, and why did they expose themselves to expensive claims and give a remarkable degree of flexibility to private lawyers to determine the scope of their regulatory autonomy? 
Only few developing country governments realized that by consenting to investment treaty arbitration, they agreed to offer international investors enforceable protections with the potential for costly and far-reaching implications.
The majority of developing countries however signed up to one of the most potent international legal regimes underwriting economic globalization without even realizing it at the time. As this thought-provoking and illuminate book implies, this state of affairs not only means that the international investment regime and its history have to be reexamined; it also provides more general lessons for our understanding of the nature of substantially uneven and unequal economic and power relations between the South and the North in the era of Neoliberal Globalization.
(An open access to the preface and the first chapter)

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

Posted in Books | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Great academic opportunities: 5 calls for papers, Postdoc, Professorship, and Winter School

call for papersSee below a list of great academic opportunities: calls for papers and participation, Post-doc and job openings in various topics and themes of economic sociology and political economy, with September 12 – 23 deadlines. Share this list with your colleagues and students. Good luck!

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

Posted in Academic announcements | Leave a comment

BITS & BRIEFS: Plutocracy and Deviant Globalization // Economic justice and black freedom movement // Corporate Power and the Myth of Liberal Ascendancy // Accounting empire

neolibaralism

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumbl

Posted in BITS & BRIEFS | Leave a comment

What is Political Economy? It is Essentially a Historical Science

In December 1867 a German positivist philosopher and economist Eugen Dührings published a critical review of Karl Marx’s CapitalDühring, inter alia, disapproved the Marxist labour theory of value and asserted, based on his own concept of “ethics of sympathy”, that a dichotomy between capitalist and proletariat is unnecessary.
Anti-DühringA decade later, as Dühring’s views had found some disciples among the German Social Democrats, Friedrich Engels (following his discussions with Marx) wrote a series of elaborated responses which would be thereafter assembled into Anti-Dühring (first entitled Herrn Eugen Dührings Umwälzung der Wissenschaft – Eugen Dührings’s Revolution in Science, 1877–78), debunking Dühring’s ideas, analysis, and his “vulgar Materialism”. But more broadly, Anti-Dühring is Engels’ major contribution to the exposition and development of Marxist theory. This fascinating and acute polemic (to which, by the way, Marx contributed too) holds profound observation in its three chapters (Philosophy, Political Economy and Socialism) and I’m calling on you to delve into them.
This post, however, focuses on a definition of political economy, as it is articulated at the beginning of the second chapter. The following paragraph not only reflects, what I term, the ontological mutual embeddedness of State-Economy-Society, but it also emphasizes that this embeddedness is essentially dynamic; namely that institutional change is an intrinsic feature of any political economy and therefore every intellectual endeavour to unravel the mazes of socio-political morphology of the economy must take this insight into account.

“Political economy, in the widest sense, is the science of the laws governing the production and exchange of the material means of subsistence in human society. Production and exchange are two different functions. Production may occur without exchange, but exchange — being necessarily an exchange of products—cannot occur without production. Each of these two social functions is subject to the action of external influences which to a great extent are peculiar to it and for this reason each has, also to a great extent, its own special laws. But on the other hand, they constantly determine and influence each other to such an extent that they might be termed the abscissa and ordinate of the economic curve.
The conditions under which men produce and exchange vary from country to country, and within each country again from generation to generation. Political economy, therefore, cannot be the same for all countries and for all historical epochs. A tremendous distance separates the bow and arrow, the stone knife and the acts of exchange among savages occurring only by way of exception, from the steam-engine of a thousand horse power, the mechanical loom, the railways and the Bank of England. The inhabitants of Tierra del Fuego have not got so far as mass production and world trade, any more than they have experience of bill-jobbing or a Stock Exchange crash. Anyone who attempted to bring the political economy of Tierra del Fuego under the same laws as are operative in present-day England would obviously produce nothing but the most banal commonplaces. Political economy is therefore essentially a historical science. It deals with material which is historical, that is, constantly changing; it must first investigate the special laws of each individual stage in the evolution of production and exchange, and only when it has completed this investigation will it be able to establish the few quite general laws which hold good for production and exchange in general.” (Engels 1877)

economic sociology markets

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

Posted in Books, Community members posts | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Growth Fetish

Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city, and a tower whose top is in the heavens; let us make a name for ourselves, lest we be scattered over the face of the whole earth.”   (The Tower of Babel passageGenesis 11:1–9)

"Turmbau zu Babel" (Tower of Babel) by Peter Angermann, 1989

“Turmbau zu Babel” (Tower of Babel) by Peter Angermann, 1989

Growth fetish

Oh, this desire to grow higher,
to construct and fabricate,
to progress, and to amass…
But let us not miscalculate:
since a limitless accumulation sinks us all to devastation,
whereas the pillars of “success” are the cliffs of our distress.

                                                                             (by Oleg Komlik)

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

Posted in Art | Tagged , | Leave a comment

BITS & BRIEFS: Markets and demarketization // Mark Blyth’s reflections // Rosa Luxemburg on the Mass Strike // Moralities and economic change in Africa

pre-capitalist market

“Village fair” by Flemish painter Gillis Mostaert (1590)

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

Posted in Art, BITS & BRIEFS | Leave a comment

BITS & BRIEFS: Exhaustion as a status symbol // Sexism on Wall Street // Business schools drive inequality // Origins and crisis of Neoliberalism

"Indolence", by Jean-Baptiste Greuze (1756)

“Indolence”, by Jean-Baptiste Greuze (1756)

***
Join the Economic Sociology and Political Economy community through
Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn / Google+ / Instagram / Reddit / Tumblr

Posted in Art, BITS & BRIEFS | Leave a comment