The Sense of Dissonance: Accounts of Worth in Economic Life

David Stark argues, firms would often be better off, especially in managing change, if they allowed multiple logics of worth and did not necessarily discourage uncertainty. In fact, in many cases multiple orders of worth are unavoidable, so organizations and firms should learn to harness the benefits of such “heterarchy” rather than seeking to purge it. Stark makes this argument with ethnographic case studies of 3 companies attempting to cope with rapid change: a machine-tool company in postcommunist Hungary, a new-media startup in New York during and after the collapse of the Internet bubble, and a Wall Street investment bank whose trading room was destroyed on 9/11. In each case, the friction of competing criteria of worth promoted an organizational reflexivity that made it easier for the company to change and deal with market uncertainty. This book makes an important contribution to the most cutting-edge debates of contemporary economic sociology and organization theory.

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