Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine

Creating the Market UniversityCreating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine is an excellent award-winning book that systematically examine why academic science made such a dramatic move toward the market. Drawing on extensive historical research, Elizabeth Popp Berman shows how the government–influenced by the argument that innovation drives the economy–brought about this transformation. Extending arguments and evidence in economics, sociology, education, management, and technology policy, Creating the Market University provides a sophisticated and compelling account of how academic scientists, and the universities within which they are embedded, increasingly embraced a market logic that valorizes patenting and technology commercialization.
Open access to the first chapter.

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One Response to Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine

  1. A very interesting analysis of the evolution of the US Universities, and its logic market role in the last decades of the 20th century. However, I think the analysis could only modelled to the Universities and academics experiences of US and not to be generalised. The academic and
    universities, as well as scientific research have been encapsulated by the powerful monopolies who controlled the economic mechanism of the American society, its high level of research and knowledge depend of the millions dollars finance by holdings in alliance with the central government. Theres is none any democratic discussion internally or externally about the principles and objectives of the (missions) of the High learning institutions at present.

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