“Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education”: how modes of material and symbolic violence undermine public pedagogy and commitment to democracy

Neoliberalism's War on Higher EducationThis important and accessible book is about how policies and modes of material and symbolic violence radically reshape the mission and practice of higher education and its institutions, short-changing a young generation suffering from – and coping with – precarity.

Henry Giroux (McMaster University) exposes the corporate forces at play and charts a clear-minded and inspired course of action out of the shadows of market-driven education policy that short-changes a young generation suffering from precarity.

He vividly describes the ‪privatization‬ of compassion, the rapid decline of higher education’s commitment to ‪democracy‬ and shared notions of the public good. Championing the youth around the globe who have dared to resist the bartering of their future, Giroux calls upon public intellectuals to speak out and defend the university as a site of critical learning and democratic promise.

Zygmut Bauman: “This book offers a profound analysis of the current state of the world and the chances of making it more hospitable to its newcomers–a warning and call to action. Obligatory reading to all of us who care, young and old alike.

Read this (open access) introduction chapter

To the book

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One Response to “Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education”: how modes of material and symbolic violence undermine public pedagogy and commitment to democracy

  1. Pingback: Ethnographies of austerity | Economic Sociology and Political Economy

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